NATURAL RESOURCES CANADA: FIREARMS POLICIES, PROCEDURES AND STATISTICS – Initial Analysis of 142-Page Response to my July 23, 2018 Access to Information Act request By Dennis R. Young – February 10, 2019

SEE PDF PAGES 137-142: NRCAN RESPONSE TO MY ORIGINAL EIGHT QUESTIONS

SEE PAGES 24-39: ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL VERIFICATION ON COMPLIANCE AND OVERSIGHT ON FIREARMS – APRIL 2017

SEE PDF PAGE 35: DEPARTMENTAL FIREARMS, TYPE, MAKE AND MODEL: 47 RIFLES, 3 HANDGUNS, 126 SHOTGUNS

SEE PDF PAGES 88-90: MEMORANDUM TO ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER – APRIL 24, 2018 – EXCERPT: “However, in specific regions of British Columbia and the Yukon, field conditions (i.e. mountainous landscapes, dense bush, and steep terrain), which generally require the use of both hands to safely traverse, make restricted firearms, specifically the .44 magnum side arm, the most appropriate solution for self-defence against wildlife.

 

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Colin Murphy
Colin Murphy
3 years ago

Interesting that NRCAN believes that “field conditions (i.e. mountainous landscapes, dense bush, and steep terrain), which generally require the use of both hands to safely traverse, make restricted firearms, specifically the .44 magnum side arm, the most appropriate solution for self-defense against wildlife” for their personnel. I would agree so why is this option to carry a sidearm not available to any one enjoying the outdoors where they wish to protect themselves. Carrying a long gun while hiking or fishing is not always a viable defense option.

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